Wednesday, 26 June 2013

You just couldn't make it up!

Gay immigrant jailed for a violent attack is allowed to stay in Britain after insisting he's 'transformed' into a straight man

  • Naushad Saboor was jailed after attack prompted by homophobic abuse
  • Sri Lankan was released after four years and 'fell in love' with British woman
  • Also applied for asylum, which failed until he used human rights laws
  • Successfully argued to judges 'his sexual orientation was transformed'

A gay immigrant who was jailed for eight years after a series of 'extremely violent' attacks will not be deported because he is now straight.
Naushad Saboor successfully argued he should stay in Britain because 'his sexual orientation was transformed from homosexual to firmly heterosexual'.
The Sri Lankan was sent to prison at Snaresbrook Crown Court in London 11 years ago for two counts of GBH after he lost control after a series of homophobic comments were made.
But after his release from jail in 2007 he was no longer gay, and married a British woman and they had a child together.
At the same time he applied for asylum, which was rejected because he had shown 'no remorse' for his crimes.
But after launching an appeal using European human rights rules, he successfully argued that being kicked out of the UK would deny him the right to a family life.
The Home Office then appealed the decision but incredibly Mr Justice Clive Lane backed Saboor instead of the Government, despite admitting his story that he went from gay to straight lacked credibility.
Tory MP Philip Davies has called it a 'perverse decision to allow a dangerous foreign criminal to stay in our country'.
'As far as I'm concerned the human rights rules and laws in our country and our judges are both as daft as each other,' he said.
'The combination of the two gives us these ridiculous judgements.
'It is these cases that prove we need top scrap it. It seems that the only people who seem to use it are prisoners and illegal immigrants.'
The Home Office said cases like this one is 'precisely why we are looking to change the law in the new Immigration Bill this year'.

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